Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Writing’

"Grace Among the Leavings" by Beverly Fisher

“Grace Among the Leavings” by Beverly Fisher

“My earliest memory is of my Grandma crying. Some news from someone coming up the road was always a source of excitement or sadness. It was hardly ever a thing you’d call lukewarm.” – Grace

The main character in this enchanting novella is a small girl named Grace who’s trying to make a little sense out of big problems. She asks too many questions, and never seems to get the answers she craves….at least not in the way she expects. It’s a sweet southern tale with a twist.

“Grace Among the Leavings”, a Novella, by Beverly Fisher is a good read. And, today, you have a chance to get it FOR FREE.  Leave a reply below, saying you’d like a copy, and we’ll pick one lucky winner to receive a copy of this new book from Thorncraft Publishing.

About the Author:
Beverly Fisher graduated from the University of Memphis and Vanderbilt Law School. She has appeared on “60 Minutes” in an expose about insurance scams. She was a staff attorney for Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee for many years before going into private practice, focusing on Social Security Disability cases. She has climbed Mt. St. Helens and many Mayan pyramids, canoed countless Southern waterways, and hiked a multitude of trails. She lives in Tennessee surrounded by woods, wildlife, creeks, springs, dogs, and love.

Read Full Post »

I am listening to  ‘I’m Dreaming of a White Christmas’.  However, as a writer, I’m really dreaming of  stress-free marketing.  I was beginning to think it really wasn’t possible. After all, we’re creative types, right? We write. We dream. We create.  We don’t typically think of marketing ideas and remain stress free at the same time.  Thinking about marketing does, on occasion, make me break out in hives.

Renea Winchester was kind enough to speak to the Writers Alliance of Georgia  this week about her new book, “Stress-Free Marketing”.  Her presentation was insightful, helpful, and we breathed a collective sigh of relief after hearing what she had to say.

Renea is on a mission to reach new and emerging authors before they fall into the traps that authors are often unaware of. She lays out the business side of writing in an easy to understand way while providing great marketing ideas that can jump-start a brainstorming session for your own project.

I recommend every writer and every author (even those with agents) read this book. She may just keep a few creative little lambs from getting sheered while giving teeth to your marketing plan.

Writers Alliance of Georgia with Guest Speaker Renea Winchester

From left to right: Beverly Forster, Donna Sundblad, Deborah Malone (sitting), Angie Kinsey, Bela and Christy Krusac, and guest speaker Renea Winchester signing a copy of her new book, “Stress-Free Marketing”. (Present but not in photo: Amy Zajac and John Leonard.)

by Angie Kisney

Read Full Post »

The process of writing is a bit like going on a journey. You know where you want to go, you need a map and a few signs to get there,  and you want to enjoy yourself along the way.

How do you do this?

Start by getting your groove on. Set a routine that will help you sit down and do the work. You must fight resistance  in all its forms (distractions, laziness, procrastination, and any acts of self-sabotage) just to get on the road.

Some key habits I use are:

  • Get up at the same time every day. Have a routine that works for you and not the other way around.
  • Set a timer for use of the internet, social media and email to limit the distractions.
  •  Use a post-it note for your to-do list. If the list won’t fit on a post-it, it won’t fit into your day.
  • Face the blank page everyday. I once wrote, “Facing this blank page is like visiting the hospital and smiling at the sick people.”  Some days will be harder than others, but face the blank page anyway and write something.

Once you have a routine, writing regularly is easier. It’s time to start your journey. It’s time to do the work.

Become a ‘Overnight Sensation’.  On average, it takes 5-10 years to become a ‘overnight sensation’. Comedians work for at least five years to become as good on stage as they are in their own living rooms.  It takes about 10 years to become a good comedian. Not great, just good. The same applies to writers when honing their craft.  The more you write, the better you will become.

Cultivate a ‘split personality’. One side of a writer’s personality is the creator. The other side is the editor.  The creator must be free of the editor in order to create.  Know the rules before you break them. Get a good style guide (Strunk & White: The Elements of Style) and familiarize yourself with it. Once you know the rules, feel free to break them (‘On Writing’ by Stephen King). When you’re finished creating, use your editorial skills to tighten up your work and make it readable.

Practice the art of seduction. A good story is all about the senses. It’s a seduction of sorts. You must draw your reader in using all their senses and make them want to keep reading. This is how you ‘show don’t tell’. Work on your art of seduction.  Put yourself in the scene before you write it. What does it look, smell,  feel, taste, sound like?

Live to create  Feed your inspiration. Hang with creative people. Stretch your boundaries. Experience new things even if you’re uncomfortable. You will draw new inspiration from these experiences, and you can later use them to describe feelings in your characters.

Remember, art is messy. Most of what you write will be crap, but that’s OK. Mine your work for gems, and polish them. Take those gems and string them together to make your story shine.

Monkey see, monkey do. Read good stories twice. Read it once to enjoy it. Read it again to see how they did it. Join a writers group. You’ll learn from other writers, and you’ll have someone to join you in your struggles. Find a mentor. Someone who is better than you, and likes you enough to help you along.

Get ready to be a billionaire.  I hate to break it to you, but writing does not equal big bucks. It’s the exception, not the rule. You should love writing, and love what you write about.  “I just write what I wanted to write. I write what amuses me. It’s totally for myself.” – J.K.Rowling. Write for yourself.

Don’t give up! Now that you are well on your way, stay on your journey, enjoy it, and don’t give up. Rejection is part of being a writer. Some of the greatest writers were rejected before they were ever published. Rejection comes with the territory. Don’t give up.

Angie Kinsey is a writer, blogger, and public speaker.  She currently has a daily inspirational blog, Anji-Kinzy-Whimzy, and a weekly blog devoted to the process of art: Angie Kinsey.

Read Full Post »

I’m an avid reader of Michael Hyatt’s blog. His advice is succinct and usually very practical.

This post contains some very useful information for bloggers and writers in general:

http://michaelhyatt.com/how-to-write-a-blog-post-in-70-minutes-or-less.html

You can find out more about Michael Hyatt here.

Read Full Post »

Here’s a great video by To-Fu  “29 Ways to Stay Creative”. My favorite is number 14. What’s yours?

Read Full Post »

I am an avid reader of Michael Hyatt’s Blog. He recently shared a video clip by Taylor Mali that illustrates the importance of proofreading better than I ever could. Enjoy!

Warning!! This clip is PG-13 in nature. 

Read Full Post »

The wide world of publishing is a tough gig.  Writing is easy by comparison.  Writer’s, Publishers, Agents, and Bloggers are all talking about the changes in the publishing industry. Now, more than ever, you need your own platform before you ever actually publish your book. Why? Well, here’s the answer:

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: